News

What are WMDs, the existing law that India seeks to change?

In keeping with India’s international obligations, the Bill proposes to amend the Weapons of Mass Destruction and Their Delivery Systems (Prohibition of Unlawful Activities) Act, 2005, to prohibit the financing of the spread of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems.

In the Lok Sabha, the Weapons of Mass Destruction and Their Delivery Systems (Prohibition of Unlawful Activities) Amendment Bill, 2022, was unanimously passed.

In keeping with India’s international obligations, the Bill proposes to amend the Weapons of Mass Destruction and Their Delivery Systems (Prohibition of Unlawful Activities) Act, 2005, to prohibit the financing of the spread of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems.

Also Read: India to face major trouble if it aligns with Russia, says the USA

The 2005 Act made it illegal to manufacture, transport, or transfer weapons of mass destruction, as well as their delivery systems.

The need to amend the Act arose, according to Bill’s Statement of Objects and Reasons, because “recently, regulations relating to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems by international organizations have expanded,” and “the United Nations Security Council’s targeted financial sanctions and the recommendations of the Financial Action Task Force have mandated against the financing of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems.”

 WMDs-

The term “weapon of mass destruction” (WMD) is thought to have been coined by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the leader of the Church of England, in 1937 in reference to the aerial bombing of civilians in the Basque town of Guernica by German and Italian fascists in support of General Franco during the Spanish Civil War.

Also Read: Alia Bhatt focused on Ranbir Kapoor’s previous connections in legacy interview “Main Thodi Na Kam Hoon”

In the early 2000s, the term “weapons of mass destruction” entered the lexicon of people and countries all over the world after the US under President George W Bush and the UK under Prime Minister Tony Blair justified the invasion of Iraq by claiming that Saddam Hussein’s government was hiding these weapons in the country. There have never been any weapons of mass destruction discovered.

Weapons from the NBC

While there is no one, definitive definition of a WMD in international law, nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) weapons are commonly recognized to be included. “A weapon of mass destruction is a nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, or another device that is intended to damage a significant number of people,” according to the US Department of Homeland Security.

The WMD Act of 2005 in India states:

* “Biological weapons” are defined as “microbial or other biological agents, or toxins…of types and quantities that have no justification for prophylactic, protective, or other peaceful purposes; and weapons, equipment, or delivery systems specially designed to use such agents or toxins for hostile purposes or in armed conflict; and weapons, equipment, or delivery systems specially designed to use such agents or toxins for hostile purposes or in armed conflict”; and

* “Chemical weapons” are defined as “toxic chemicals and their precursors” used for peaceful, protective, and specific military and law enforcement purposes; “munitions and devices specifically designed to cause death or other harm through the toxic properties of those toxic chemicals”; and “equipment specifically designed for use in connection with the employment of these munitions and devices.”

Control over the use of weapons of mass destruction

A variety of international treaties and accords govern the use of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons.

The Geneva Protocol, signed in 1925, prohibited the use of chemical and biological weapons; the Biological Weapons Convention, signed in 1972, and the Chemical Weapons Convention, signed in 1992, both established extensive bans on biological and chemical weapons.

Both the 1972 and 1992 treaties have been signed and ratified by India. Despite the fact that numerous countries have been accused of non-compliance, there are very few non-signatory countries to these treaties.

Treaties such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty govern the use and proliferation of nuclear weapons (CTBT).

Read More: On the 42nd anniversary of the BJP’s founding, Prime Minister Modi made a jab at the opposition with his “two kinds of politics” remark.

Related Articles

Back to top button